Monday, October 31, 2011

Lions, and Tigers and Gargoyles OH MY!

Have you ever wondered why so many beautiful buildings are adorned by some mighty scary looking creatures?  I have a thing for architecture and could spend a whole day just looking at the outside of this home.    Any guesses who lived here?  Yes, it was one family with one child!

The term originates from the French gargouille, which in English literally means "throat" or otherwise known as the "gullet";[2] cf. Latin gurgulio, gula, gargula ("gullet" or "throat") and similar words derived from the root gar, "to swallow", which represented the gurgling sound of water (e.g., Spanish garganta, "throat"; Spanish gárgola, "gargoyle"). It is also connected to the French verb gargariser, which means "to gargle."[3] The Italian word for gargoyle is doccione or gronda sporgente, an architecturally precise phrase which means "protruding gutter." The Germanword for gargoyle is Wasserspeier, which means "water spewer." The Dutch word for gargoyle is waterspuwer, which means "water spitter" or "water vomiter." A building that has gargoyles on it is "gargoyled."
grotesque figure, also known as gargoyle is a sculpture that does not work as a waterspout and serves only an ornamental or artistic function,[2] although the field of architecture usually preserves the distinction between gargoyles (functional waterspouts) and non-waterspout grotesques.
Gargoyles are said to scare off and protect from any evil or harmful spirits.
May the gargoyles be with you on this halloween!

Happy Halloween from junk evolution!